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A sheen of oil is visible along the shoreline of Sandy Hook Bay in the Gateway National Recreation Area a day after an apparent fuel spill was discovered on Dec. 11, 2014. Photo by Brian Donohue | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

 

A mysterious 2-mile long oil slick appeared Thursday on Sandy Hook Bay, the 400-foot wide diesel spill causing environmental concerns. Coast Guard and Parks officials worried the contamination could endanger the seal population that migrates to the area every winter. [NBC News4 New York]

via wikipedia

 

NBC News4 New York: The Coast Guard worked into the night setting up a boom over a culvert in an effort to catch the oil before it could reach the environmentally sensitive, and popular horseshoe cove tidal marsh. 

via NPS.org

 

Great and harbor seals are known to migrate to Sandy Hook Bay, and the National Park Service says the animals have already moved there for the season.

via NBC News4 New York

 

Officials at the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine said the food supply for the seals could be compromised. If fish ingest the oil, the officials explained, and a seal eats enough of those fish, the seal could die.

Officials said the oil sheen also threatens the sea water intake pipe for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries lab on Sandy Hook.

The cause of the oil slick is under investigation.

Read more from NBC News4 New York here…

 

Photo Credit: Ingfbruno/Wikipedia

Almost one year to the day after Sandy swamped it with 8-foot storm surges, Ellis Island is reopening to the public.

For the past year, the National Park Service has been working to repair the national monument after water damaged boilers and electrical systems, leaving Ellis Island without any power for months.

This Monday, Ellis Island will open her doors once more.

The Ellis Island Immigration Museum. Photo Credit: NPS

AP News via abc News: Ellis Island will reopen to the public Monday, almost exactly a year after Superstorm Sandy’s swells reached 8 feet and badly damaged the former U.S. immigration entry point.

“We are delighted to be able to share Ellis Island’s uniquely American story with the world once more,” Superintendent David Luchsinger said in a statement Thursday.

Ellis Island after the superstorm. Photo Credit: NPS

The Oct. 29 storm swamped boilers and electrical systems, and the 27.5-acre island in New York Harbor was without power for months.

The Ellis Island Immigration Museum, housed in the main building on the island, showcases the stories of the millions of immigrants who passed through the island to start their lives in the United States.

More than 20 million people passed through the federal immigration station between 1892 and 1954. Photo Credit: Bettmann/Corbis via History.com

More than a million documents, photographs and other artifacts at the museum were moved before the storm because it was impossible to maintain the climate-controlled environment needed for their preservation.

National Park Service staff pass boxes of artifacts down the stairs near the Great Hall. Photo Credit: Kevin Daley, National Park Service via Tribeca Trib Online

While the halls and buildings will reopen, the artifacts remain in a temporary storage facility in Maryland, park officials said. There is no estimate on when they will return to the island, because considerable work to upgrade and fix the buildings is still ongoing.

Doors and windows to Ferry Building knocked down by storm surge. Photo Credit: NPS

“You’re not going to see a complete restoration of Ellis Island for a while,” spokesman John Warren said.

Crews are still working on revamping so that the next bad storm won’t leave the island shuttered for a year, he said.

Post-Sandy damage. Photo Credit: NPS

There is no cost estimate yet on how much it will take to repair and revamp the island.

by Mai Armstrong for the Working Harbor Committee

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